Clifford Spencer now NEPAD’s Goodwill Ambassador

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NEPAD Agency Chief Executive Officer Dr Ibrahim Mayaki has announced the appointment of Clifford Spencer as NEPAD Goodwill Ambassador.

Mr Spencer is a professional farmer with over 40 years’ experience in global agriculture and is internationally recognised for developing alternative crops and agronomic practices. According to Dr Mayaki, Mr. Spencer will be an excellent and eloquent advocate on NEPAD’s development agenda given his strong commitment to the values and principles of NEPAD. His experience and talent will assist the NEPAD Agency reach out to and engage with important stakeholders, he noted.

Mr. Spencer expressed his gratitude on the appointment and emphasized that he will use his experience and expertise to drive the NEPAD agenda forward.

Mr Spencer acted for over a decade as a senior adviser to the United Nations Foundation on agriculture and bioenergy and the development of affordable energy, through which he developed strategies for Africa in the areas of climate change, land, lakes and seas. He has served on a panel of the National Institute of Agricultural Botany and Processors and Growers Research Organisation and as a national judge for the Agricultural Trade Awards. He is a Barclays Bank Farm of the Year award winner, former Barclays Bank business judge, previous Chairman of a regional Farming Group for the UK SustainableStrategy in Farming and Food and a UK Institute of Directors ‘Director of the Month’.

As Chief Executive Officer at the Global Biotechnology Transfer Foundation, Mr. Spencer promotes awareness of the potential for biotechnology to support sustainable, long-term, socio-economic development. Upon leaving active farming Clifford became Head of Operations at the G4 Group and was responsible for operations in South America, Africa, India and China. He is listed in “Who’s Who in the World 2015”.

The NEPAD Planning and Coordinating Agency (NPCA), is a technical body and development vehicle of the African Union (AU). The NPCA is responsible for the implementation of the New Partnership for Africa’s Development (NEPAD), a strategic framework for pan-African socio-economic development. In order to address critical challenges facing the continent, the NPCA facilitates and coordinates development programmes and projects, pushing for partnerships, resource mobilization, research and knowledge management.

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Traditional Remedies for your Home

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 imageimage 

Herbs have always been medicine of people; traditional remedies handed down from mother to daughter and used by initiative village healers. In earlier times their property seemed magical and over the centuries healing plants have attracted their fair share of myths and legends.

For people who have no knowledge of biochemistry and pharmacology, the action of many herbs in healing disease could only be described in terms of magic. Cause of illness could not be subjected to scientific scruinity but were often seen instead as invading evils.

Traditional Chines medicine still talks of the six evils which can cause illness –wind, heat, cold, dryness, dampness and too much heat. While our Anglo-Saxon ancestor’s preferred to view illness in terms of elf shot and flying venoms.

Herbs For treating these hailments,often those we would describe as anti inflammatory or anti bacterial , were imbued with magical properties and complex rites were necessary to maximize their potency.

Growing herbs

There is nothing nicer than being able to go to your own garden or window box and sniff a few herbs. Also tend to be more potent thancommercial specimen which may have been stored for many months before sale. Growing herbs is more difficult than cultivating any other sort of herbaceous plants or shrubs and they will also provide a constant array of healing aromas to enjoy in your garden.

Herbs have always been medicine of people; traditional remedies handed down from mother to daughter and used by initiative village healers. In earlier times their property seemed magical and over the centuries healing plants have attracted their fair share of myths and legends.

For people who have no knowledge of biochemistry and pharmacology, the action of many herbs in healing disease could only be described in terms of magic. Cause of illness could not be subjected to scientific scruinity but were often seen instead as invading evils.

Traditional Chines medicine still talks of the six evils which can cause illness –wind, heat, cold, dryness, dampness and too much heat. While our Anglo-Saxon ancestor’s preferred to view illness in terms of elf shot and flying venoms.

Herbs For treating these hailments,often those we would describe as anti inflammatory or anti bacterial , were imbued with magical properties and complex rites were necessary to maximize their potency.

Growing herbs

There is nothing nicer than being able to go to your own garden or window box and sniff a few herbs. Also tend to be more potent thancommercial specimen which may have been stored for many months before sale. Growing herbs is more difficult than cultivating any other sort of herbaceous plants or shrubs and they will also provide a constant array of healing aromas to enjoy in your garden.

Farm radio international drama

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Using radio drama to promote orange fleshed sweet potatoes in Uganda
 

 

Florence knows something is wrong with her children. They are chronically ill, have bad skin, suffer from diarrhea and have persistent coughs. But then she learns many of these problems can be reduced through diet—by farming and eating a vitamin A-rich tuber—the orange fleshed sweet potato (OFSP).

Florence is the fictional heroine starring in Farm Radio International’s soon-to-be-broadcast mini drama radio series, My Children. But the story of this Ugandan mother and farmer is very real for many families in sub-Saharan Africa.

The World Health Organization estimates that 250 million preschool children are vitamin A deficient. Vitamin A deficiency is the leading cause of preventable blindness in children and may increase the risk of maternal mortality in pregnant women.

The 30-episode radio drama is currently in production and will be aired in six languages by ten partner radio stations in Uganda. The above audio clip is from the Luganda production. Farm Radio International expects the mini-series will contribute to increased knowledge of the nutrition, preparation and consumption of OFSP as 350,000 households in 13 districts have access to the mini-series.

The HarvestPlus-funded mini-drama was designed for maximum impact. Our team conducted rapid formative research in 13 districts to understand current radio listening habits and preferences and to seek out content and topics important to farmers.

Check out some of our latest live polling results that were gathered using the TracFM system:    https://www.tracfm.org/p/view/480/

 

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